The Problem of the Minimalist Definition of “Reformed”

An essay on being Reformed was brought to my attention (the essay is no longer published on the original source) many years ago now.  It is an interesting piece because it represents a widely held position among Evangelicals and the broader Reformed . . . Continue reading →

Richard Muller—Jonathan Edwards And The Absence Of Free Choice: A Parting Of Ways In The Reformed Tradition

Lost Audio Recovered

Richard Muller’s lost lecture on Jonathan Edwards’ doctrine of free choice. Continue reading →

An Overlooked Aspect Of The Story: PCA Influence On Acts 29 And Mars Hill

Regular readers of the Heidelblog and listeners of the Heidelcast will know that considerable time has been spent here analyzing and interacting with the podcast series produced by Christianity Today and hosted by Mike Cosper (see the resources below).

Aldo Leon: Discovering The Reformed Confession In Miami

In my Baptist seminary I had a class that required me to do devotions in John Calvin’s, Institutes of the Christian Religion.  What shocked me was how much Calvin’s theological arguments were inundated with Bible references from the totality of the scriptures (not just parts).  When Calvin spoke of baptism, he spoke from the totality of the Bible, not merely a few references in Acts.  It was in that moment that I saw the stark contrast from my reformed-ish circle.  We talked a lot about the Bible and had a lot of assumptions that we brought to the Bible; but Calvin taught much from the Bible and drew his assumptions about the Bible from the Bible itself.  Continue reading →

Reformation Day, The Trinity, And The Culture War

Some objected to the critics of the Federal Vision that the social crisis is too great that to be arguing about the Federal Vision. That objection has resurface in recent days in the wake of a social media post in which a prominent member of the Young, Restless, and Reformed Movement and a Baptist theologian has argued, “The Father is the Father because he sends the Son. The Son is the Son because he submits to the Father’s will. The Spirit is the Spirit because the Father and the Son send Him. There is no Trinity without the order of authority and submission” (emphasis original).  As one might imagine, this line of reasoning has prompted a considerable response. In response to the critics, some have re-stated the same argument made by the Federal Visionists and their enablers in 2008: “Are we really going to start arguing about ESS again? With all the other stuff going on in the world, this is the battle some of you want to fight? Again? I seriously do not understand some of you. Like, at all.” Continue reading →

You Are Not A Canonical Actor Or How To Avoid Nightmare Alley

Episode 8 of the Christianity Today podcast, “The Rise and Fall of Mars Hill,” illustrates the degree to which the restless, feather-swallowing (according to Luther) anti-canonical spirit has influenced modern evangelical theology, piety, and practice. The Reformation principle (if not always its practice) . . . Continue reading →

Mark Driscoll And The Danger Of “God Told Me”

I am catching up Christianity Today’s podcast series, “The Rise and Fall of Mars Hill. The August 30, 2021 episode, “Questioning the Origin Myth: A Rise and Fall Short Story,” centered around what, in Reformed theology, piety, and practice, we call the internal call to ministry. In our understanding of Scripture and its outworking in the life of the church there are two aspects to the call to ministry, the internal and the external. Continue reading →

John Piper, Future Grace: The Purifying Power of the Promises of God, rev. ed. (New York: Multnomah, 2012)—A Thorough Review

Pastor John Piper is well-known for his role in sparking the “young, restless, and Reformed” movement, mainly through his emphases on God’s sovereignty and serious expository preaching. There are no doubt numerous present members of Reformed churches who ended up there because of initial investigations of Reformed theology that began with hearing or reading John Piper. Personally, Piper was my first exposure to a thorough and biblical explanation of predestination in some of the appendices of the 2003 edition of Desiring God, which I was told to read shortly after becoming serious about my faith. Continue reading →

The Unexamined Premise Behind Mars Hill: Transformationalism

One of the unexamined themes Of the podcast series, The Rise and Fall of Mars Hill, is the stated purpose of the Mars Hill congregation and movement: to transform the Seattle metro. Continue reading

Piper’s Sea Shell Sermon Illustrates How Far The YRR Movement Was From The Reformation

So I am listening to the latest episode in the Christianity Today podcast series, “The Rise and Fall of Mars Hill.” Like the others it is illuminating, compelling, and frustrating simultaneously. Continue reading

Former Mars Hill Elders Plead For Driscoll To Resign Over Continuing Abuse Of The Sheep

Kate Shellnut posted a story yesterday at Christianity Today revealing that 39 elders from the former Mars Hill church, from which Mark Driscoll was removed because he abused the staff and members, have published a letter calling for him to resign from . . . Continue reading →

New Resource Page: On The Young, Restless, And Reformed/New Calvinist Movement

Since the early 2000s, the so-called Young, Restless, and Reformed or New Calvinist movement has been one of the more significant movements in American evangelicalism. Its scope and influence was chronicled by Collin Hansen’s, Young, Restless, Reformed: A Journalist’s Journey with the . . . Continue reading →

Julie Roys Interviews Insiders From Mark Driscoll’s Current Congregation

And the hits just keep coming. Not only is Christianity Today producing a podcast series doing a post-mortem of Mars Hill Church

An Illuminating Podcast From Christianity Today On The Rise And Fall Of Mars Hill

Christianity Today has released a new NPR-style podcast series hosted by Mike Cosper, “Who Killed Mars Hill?.” It is well done and deserves your attention. So far they have released a couple of trailers and two complete episodes. Cosper is sympathetically critical . . . Continue reading →