Thomas Cartwright Contra Lent

RHEMI. [ 1. Desert.] As John the Baptist, so our Saviour by going into the desert and there living in contemplation even among brute beasts, and subject to the assaults of the Devil for our sins, gives a warrant and example to . . . Continue reading →

Resources On Lent

William Whittaker Contra Lent Richard Sibbes Contra Lent Owen Contra Lent, Easter, And The Normative Principle Of Worship With The Reformed Pubcast On Lent And Sola Scriptura The Reformed Defense Of Christian Liberty In 1530 The Reformed Reject Lent In Basle In . . . Continue reading →

William Whittaker Contra Lent

“But you tell us, why we do so much avoid the Fathers.” I had rather you would tell us why you do so carefully avoid the Scriptures. “For” (say you) “they that cannot away with set times of Fasting, must needs be . . . Continue reading →

Richard Sibbes Contra Lent

Some make a mockery of the holy things of God. One part of the year they will be holy; a rotten, foolish affection of people that are popish. In Lent they will use a little austerity, oh! they will please God wondrously! . . . Continue reading →

On Still Small Voices And Allegories

One of the first things I learned when I became an evangelical Christian in 1976, the year America elected a self-proclaimed “Born Again” Christian (Jimmy Carter), was that every Christian should expect to hear a “still small voice” from God. I learned . . . Continue reading →

With Janet Mefferd On Sola Scriptura

As early as the late 4th century, challenged by a variety of claims of religious authority, many of whom claimed to have an unwritten secret tradition or revelation, Basil the Great (c.330–79), one of the Cappadocian Fathers, rather than standing on the . . . Continue reading →

Calvin Contra Sadoleto: Sola Scriptura

As I hasten to a conclusion, I am compelled to pass by your calumny, that, leaning entirely to our own judgment, we find not in the whole Church one individual to whom we think deference is due. That it is a calumny, . . . Continue reading →

Machen: The Regulative Principle Governs The Church

Machen’s reasoning here was an extension of the Regulative Principle. In the Presbyterian and Reformed tradition this principle has typically been applied to public worship. It teaches that we may only worship God as he has commanded us to worship him in . . . Continue reading →