An Appreciation Of Messrs Murray And Young On The Rule Of Worship

When we think about John Murray we might think first of his defense of the biblical doctrine of The Imputation of Adam’s Sin or we might think of his judicious application of Scripture in Principles of Conduct. Others might think of Mr . . . Continue reading →

Ursinus: The Law Is The Rule Of Worship

Another use of the moral law is, that it may be a rule of divine worship and of a Christian life. “Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path.” “I will put my law in their . . . Continue reading →

Presbyterian And Reformed Ambivalence About Christmas

The Christmas season is nearing its climax. As the shopping ebbs and the work schedule slows a bit (for some anyway—remember in your prayers your local police and firefighters as this can be a difficult time for them) it gives us opportunity . . . Continue reading →

The First Book Of Discipline (1560) On Holy Days

The word of God only, which is the New and Old Testament, shall be taught in every kirk within this realm; and all contrary doctrine to the same shall be impugned and utterly suppressed. We affirm that to be contrary doctrine to . . . Continue reading →

Knox On The Regulative Principle

All worshipping, honoring or service invented by the brain of man in the religion of God, without his own express commandment, is idolatry. The mass is invented by the brain of man without any commandment of God: Therefore it is idolatry. —John . . . Continue reading →

Heidelberg 96–98: Worshiping The True God Truly (2)

The regulative principle of worship, however, does distinguish confession Reformed and Presbyterian churches from the broad evangelical traditions, many of whom are descended from the Pietists and the Anabaptists. The confessional Lutheran churches, the Anglican church, and the Romanists all operate on the normative principle. That principle works for many things in daily life. May one cross this street? Yes, certainly. It is not forbidden. The regulative principle, however, does not work for daily life. “Must I cross this street?” It was never intended to applied to daily life, outside of public worship. In the same way, the normative principle does not work for public worship. Continue reading →

Heidelberg 66: Sacraments Are No More Or Less Than Gospel Signs And Seals (1)

66. What are the Sacraments? The Sacraments are visible holy signs and seals appointed of God for this end, that by the use thereof He may the more fully declare and seal to us the promise of the Gospel: namely, that of . . . Continue reading →

Hungarian Reformed Churches: Instruments Are Shadows

Now that Christ has come, and together with the ancient priesthood and sacrifice and the representation appertaining to the Law, the use of instruments in churches has vanished like a shadow…There is not so much as a reference to the organ in the New Testament, nor of its introduction into the purer church; but it was only introduced in the theatrical masses, as if in obscene sport, by immoral priests to make clowns cut capers. Continue reading →