Help Recover One Of The Most Important (And Neglected) Reformed Theologians For English Readers

Gijsbertus Voetius (1589–1676) is perhaps the linchpin of Dutch Reformed theology in the 17th century. To shift metaphors, he is the Grand Central Station of Reformed orthodoxy in the Netherlands. In one way or another all the various trains seem to run . . . Continue reading →

The Allure Of Unwritten Tradition

The earliest post-apostolic Christians (some of whom are denominated the Apostolic Fathers) knew of an apostolic tradition but they did not know about a secret and unwritten apostolic tradition on the authority of which the church could justify virtually anything it wanted. . . . Continue reading →

Pies, Docs, Kuyps, And Confessionalists

The first time I heard the expression, “Pies, Docs, and Kuyps” was during a seminary lecture by Derke Bergsma. He was relating what had already become a fairly standard sociological taxonomy in the Reformed world. There are three kinds of Reformed folk: . . . Continue reading →

Resources On A Covenantal Approach To The Christian Life

Chris writes to the HB to ask about moving from the conversionist paradigm for the Christian life to the covenantal vision for the Christian life, how does a “covenantal” approach to the Christian life appear? This is an important question. Since the . . . Continue reading →

Jackson, “Unto” And “Toward” In Ephesians 4:11–12, And Every Member Ministry

American evangelical Christianity has both influenced and been influenced by shifts in American culture since before the founding of the Republic. One of the shifts, which has had lasting effects, was the turn toward a more radically democratic turn in politics at . . . Continue reading →

What Good Are Confessions And Catechisms If They Are Not Inerrant?

Recovering the Reformed Confession

A correspondent writes to the HB to ask, in effect, if confessions are not infallible, what good are they? He asks, Westminster Confession 31:4 seems to be problematic, since it says all synods…have erred or may err, and thus are not to . . . Continue reading →

Truth Offends Narcissists

Truth as a proposition is found to be offensive by what it implies. That is, if the proposition is correct I must be wrong, ergo you are judging me. Or, if we are passionate about the truth the response is normally, ‘why . . . Continue reading →