A Wonderful Illustration Of The Necessity Of An Objective Definition Of Reformed

Recovering the Reformed Confession

Trevin Wax and David Fitch have been in a dialogue in which each of them has published a post expressing appreciation for the other’s tradition. Wax identifies as Reformed and Fitch as Anabaptist. The reader can draw his own conclusions as to . . . Continue reading →

What Good Are Confessions And Catechisms If They Are Not Inerrant?

Recovering the Reformed Confession

A correspondent writes to the HB to ask, in effect, if confessions are not infallible, what good are they? He asks, Westminster Confession 31:4 seems to be problematic, since it says all synods…have erred or may err, and thus are not to . . . Continue reading →

Why Some Baptists Do Not Call Themselves “Reformed”

We don’t call ourselves Reformed Baptists because we reserve the word Reformed for people who are actually Reformed.” “Chuck Finney” (A Baptist Minister) on Presbycast episode 13 “Undead Unificating”

Why Love Is Not A Mark Of The True Church

I was listening to a podcast recently in which someone remarked that Reformed churches can be “cold.” In my first pastorate I had an elder who used to joke that, in the days before refrigeration, “they used to build the Reformed church . . . Continue reading →

Review of J. I. Packer, Puritan Portraits

J. I. Packer is a significant figure in a variety of circles. He is one of the last voices representing that generation of British evangelicalism hat had roots in the Reformation, that was articulate, warm, and evangelical in the best sense of . . . Continue reading →

Nicole: What Happened To Amyraldianism?

France. As may be gathered from the above account, the influence of Amyraut was constantly on the increase between 1637 and 1659. At first, only a few provinces and the Church of Paris supported him, and there was resolute opposition in many . . . Continue reading →

Nicole On Phase Two: Opposition To Amyraut Builds

In 1641, Amyraut took the pen to defend Calvin’s view of reprobation, which had been severely criticized in an anonymous work. In this volume, titled Doctrinae J. Calvini de Absoluto Reprobationis Decreto Defensio, Amyraut took occasion to reassert covertly his main positions . . . Continue reading →

Bavinck: Amyraldianism A Species Of Rationalism

In Calvin, these two perspectives are still connected with each other, but in Reformed theology they soon split apart, and both developed in a one-sided direction. Under the influence of Socinianism and Remonstrantism, Cartesianism and Amyraldism, there sprang up the neonomian view . . . Continue reading →

Charles Hodge Contra Amyraut

According to the common doctrine of Augustinians, as expressed in the Westminster Catechism, “God, having … elected some to everlasting life, did enter into a covenant of grace, to deliver them out of the estate of sin and misery, and to bring . . . Continue reading →