If You Want To Know What P&R Christians Believe, Read The Confessions

HB readers frequently write to ask, “What do Reformed Christians believe about x?” It really does not matter what x is. It might be predestination (it frequently is) or it might be baptism (it is frequently is) or it might be about . . . Continue reading →

Are The Remonstrants Heretics (2)?

In part one we considered the definition of heresy. We saw that there is a distinction to be made between heresy defined narrowly and broadly. The question remains, what should we think of the Remonstrants? In 1610 they made their Remonstrance against . . . Continue reading →

Are The Remonstrants Heretics? (1)

This question comes over the transom regularly. I think most confessional Reformed pastors would probably say that, though they disagree strongly with Arminianism, it is not heresy. Somewhere I read (or heard) that William Ames (1576–1633),   who served as an advisor . . . Continue reading →

A Wonderful Illustration Of The Necessity Of An Objective Definition Of Reformed

Recovering the Reformed Confession

Trevin Wax and David Fitch have been in a dialogue in which each of them has published a post expressing appreciation for the other’s tradition. Wax identifies as Reformed and Fitch as Anabaptist. The reader can draw his own conclusions as to . . . Continue reading →

Why Some Baptists Do Not Call Themselves “Reformed”

We don’t call ourselves Reformed Baptists because we reserve the word Reformed for people who are actually Reformed.” “Chuck Finney” (A Baptist Minister) on Presbycast episode 13 “Undead Unificating”

Why Love Is Not A Mark Of The True Church

I was listening to a podcast recently in which someone remarked that Reformed churches can be “cold.” In my first pastorate I had an elder who used to joke that, in the days before refrigeration, “they used to build the Reformed church . . . Continue reading →

What The Spirit Is Doing Or What We Are Saying? Distinguishing Reformed And Pentecostal Piety

What happens is that contemporary evangelical and charismatic folk describe ordinary phenomena in extraordinary, apostolic terms. They identify non-apostolic phenomena as apostolic. That is cheating but it is rhetorically powerful and persuasive. Many evangelicals do not want to live in the post-canonical, in between time. It is a drag. People want a power religion. Judged against the neo-Pentecostal and charismatic claims, Reformed Christianity seems decidedly weak and powerless (see all of 2 Corinthians). Continue reading →

With Calvinist Batman On Covenant Theology And Reformed Identity

There are a number of evangelical people who are questioning the broadly evangelical theology, piety, and practice (whether Dispensational or Pentecostal or both) they inherited. For them covenant is a new category and they are working through the implications of the history of redemption . . . Continue reading →

Review of J. I. Packer, Puritan Portraits

J. I. Packer is a significant figure in a variety of circles. He is one of the last voices representing that generation of British evangelicalism hat had roots in the Reformation, that was articulate, warm, and evangelical in the best sense of . . . Continue reading →

Nicole: What Happened To Amyraldianism?

France. As may be gathered from the above account, the influence of Amyraut was constantly on the increase between 1637 and 1659. At first, only a few provinces and the Church of Paris supported him, and there was resolute opposition in many . . . Continue reading →