Help Recover One Of The Most Important (And Neglected) Reformed Theologians For English Readers

Gijsbertus Voetius (1589–1676) is perhaps the linchpin of Dutch Reformed theology in the 17th century. To shift metaphors, he is the Grand Central Station of Reformed orthodoxy in the Netherlands. In one way or another all the various trains seem to run . . . Continue reading →

Knox On The Regulative Principle

All worshipping, honoring or service invented by the brain of man in the religion of God, without his own express commandment, is idolatry. The mass is invented by the brain of man without any commandment of God: Therefore it is idolatry. —John . . . Continue reading →

Ambrose: Psalms Unite The Church

Psalms are song by emperors; the common people rejoice in them. Each man does his utmost in singing what will be a blessing to all. Psalms are sung in the home and rehearsed on the streets. The psalm is learned without labor . . . Continue reading →

Heidelberg 96–98: Worshiping The True God Truly (2)

The regulative principle of worship, however, does distinguish confession Reformed and Presbyterian churches from the broad evangelical traditions, many of whom are descended from the Pietists and the Anabaptists. The confessional Lutheran churches, the Anglican church, and the Romanists all operate on the normative principle. That principle works for many things in daily life. May one cross this street? Yes, certainly. It is not forbidden. The regulative principle, however, does not work for daily life. “Must I cross this street?” It was never intended to applied to daily life, outside of public worship. In the same way, the normative principle does not work for public worship. Continue reading →

Fifth-Century Church: Instruments Were For Moses

Q: If songs were invented by unbelievers with a design of deceiving, and were appointed for those under the law, because of the childishness of their minds, why do they who have received the perfect instructions of grace, which are most contrary . . . Continue reading →

Heidelberg 66: Sacraments Are No More Or Less Than Gospel Signs And Seals (1)

66. What are the Sacraments? The Sacraments are visible holy signs and seals appointed of God for this end, that by the use thereof He may the more fully declare and seal to us the promise of the Gospel: namely, that of . . . Continue reading →

Hungarian Reformed Churches: Instruments Are Shadows

Now that Christ has come, and together with the ancient priesthood and sacrifice and the representation appertaining to the Law, the use of instruments in churches has vanished like a shadow…There is not so much as a reference to the organ in the New Testament, nor of its introduction into the purer church; but it was only introduced in the theatrical masses, as if in obscene sport, by immoral priests to make clowns cut capers. Continue reading →