How The Dutch Reformed Lost The Psalms

The king’s arbitrary actions roused very little public dissent. Most clergy were happy to get paid regularly again and their parishioners welcomed the restoration of the national church, even if it was subject to closer government control. Opposition against the new regime . . . Continue reading →

Resources For Recovering Psalmody

We know what Jesus’ songbook was. His songbook is as near to you as your Bible. It is in your Old Testament. It appears just between Job and Proverbs. You may be forgiven for being confused because your English translation of Matthew . . . Continue reading →

The Intent Of The Psalms Is To Reveal Christ

Though the “Book of Praises” was gathered during the OT era and used in the Temple’s worship, its full intent as a canon of praise could not be fully grasped until Christ came. Its intent was to reveal and praise the Savior-King . . . Continue reading →

Heidelberg 128: The Doxology

We might first associate the word doxology with the song often sung at the close of public worship services but it is, in fact, two Greek words (δόξᾰ + λογία), which was taken over into medieval Latin and thence into English in . . . Continue reading →

How We Lost The Psalms

In the course of time the constraint of Calvin’s ideals has gradually come to be less felt in the worship of the Reformed Churches. A modification of view as to the relations of art and worship has permitted the harmonization of congregational . . . Continue reading →

Ambrose: Psalms Unite The Church

Psalms are song by emperors; the common people rejoice in them. Each man does his utmost in singing what will be a blessing to all. Psalms are sung in the home and rehearsed on the streets. The psalm is learned without labor . . . Continue reading →