Worship: A Dialogue Not A Checklist

Most of the debate over the so-called “worship wars” for the last 30 years has focused on the disagreement between those who favor a progressive/contemporary style of worship and those who favor a more “traditional” style of worship. One of the reasons . . . Continue reading →

If Believers Are Playing Instruments In Heaven, Why May We Not? (2)

The question before us concerns what the church ought to do in public worship. Christians often ask, “If they did x in Scripture, why may we not do them now?” In part 1 we considered the problems associated with this approach to . . . Continue reading →

If Believers Are Playing Instruments In Heaven, Why May We Not? (1)

Whenever a defense is advanced for something like the historic Reformed understanding of the rule of worship one of the objections that regularly arises is this: if musical instruments are being used in Scripture, we may we not use them now in . . . Continue reading →

How The Dutch Reformed Lost The Psalms

The king’s arbitrary actions roused very little public dissent. Most clergy were happy to get paid regularly again and their parishioners welcomed the restoration of the national church, even if it was subject to closer government control. Opposition against the new regime . . . Continue reading →

Machen: The Regulative Principle Governs The Church

Machen’s reasoning here was an extension of the Regulative Principle. In the Presbyterian and Reformed tradition this principle has typically been applied to public worship. It teaches that we may only worship God as he has commanded us to worship him in . . . Continue reading →

If We May Pray Uninspired Words, Why May We Not Sing Them?

What the Fathers called the “rule of faith” (which included both doctrine and practice) and what Calvin called the “rule of worship” Christians in the Presbyterian and Reformed tradition have called the “regulative principle of worship” since the mid-20th century. That rule, . . . Continue reading →

The Rule Of Worship, Christ And Culture, And Asparagus Fest

As near as I am able to determine, the first fellow in the procession is a minister in the Church of England.  I infer this from his (Roman) clerical garb, from which I infer that he might also be sympathetic to the . . . Continue reading →

The Church Of The Holy Elaboration

One of the highlights  of the Spring semester is the opportunity to read through and discuss the Belgic Confession. Yesterday, as we worked through articles 24–27 a theme emerged. One of the great differences between the Roman communion and the Reformed communions . . . Continue reading →