If We May Pray Uninspired Words, Why May We Not Sing Them?

What the Fathers called the “rule of faith” (which included both doctrine and practice) and what Calvin called the “rule of worship” Christians in the Presbyterian and Reformed tradition have called the “regulative principle of worship” since the mid-20th century. That rule, . . . Continue reading →

The Rule Of Worship, Christ And Culture, And Asparagus Fest

As near as I am able to determine, the first fellow in the procession is a minister in the Church of England.  I infer this from his (Roman) clerical garb, from which I infer that he might also be sympathetic to the . . . Continue reading →

The Church Of The Holy Elaboration

One of the highlights  of the Spring semester is the opportunity to read through and discuss the Belgic Confession. Yesterday, as we worked through articles 24–27 a theme emerged. One of the great differences between the Roman communion and the Reformed communions . . . Continue reading →

With The Reformed Pubcast On Lent And Sola Scriptura

According to the western church calendar this is the Lenten season (the 40 days from “Shrove Tuesday” to Easter) and it is being more widely observed within NAPARC. This is worth noting since, historically, most Reformed churches have not observed Lent and have . . . Continue reading →

Sola Scriptura Protects Christian Liberty

In April 1521, when Martin Luther stood before the powers of this world at the Diet of Worms, he did so on the basis of  the sole, unique, and final authority of God’s Word. Luther confessed that his conscience was bound by . . . Continue reading →

The Reformed Defense Of Christian Liberty In 1530

When, therefore, we saw very evidently that the chief men in the Church Beyond the authority of Scripture assumed this authority so to enjoin fasts as to bind men’s consciences, We allowed consciences to be freed from these snares, but by the . . . Continue reading →

The Westminster Divines On Holy Days

THERE is no day commanded in scripture to be kept holy under the gospel but the Lord’s day, which is the Christian Sabbath. Festival days, vulgarly called Holy-days, having no warrant in the word of God, are not to be continued. Nevertheless, . . . Continue reading →

Relics Remain

It is a general, if unstated, assumption among moderns that whatever the causes of the Reformation might have been, they must be long past. Often, however, that assumption is ill-founded. In fact, the fundamental causes for the Reformation (e.g., the Roman denial . . . Continue reading →