The Allure Of Unwritten Tradition

The earliest post-apostolic Christians (some of whom are denominated the Apostolic Fathers) knew of an apostolic tradition but they did not know about a secret and unwritten apostolic tradition on the authority of which the church could justify virtually anything it wanted. . . . Continue reading →

What Good Are Confessions And Catechisms If They Are Not Inerrant?

Recovering the Reformed Confession

A correspondent writes to the HB to ask, in effect, if confessions are not infallible, what good are they? He asks, Westminster Confession 31:4 seems to be problematic, since it says all synods…have erred or may err, and thus are not to . . . Continue reading →

Luther On Defining Good Works (1520)

1. The first thing to know is that there are no good works except those works God has commanded, just as there is no sin except that which God has forbidden. Therefore, whoever wants to know what good works are as well . . . Continue reading →

Resources On Continuing Revelation

Since the Second Great Awakening, in the 19th century, modern evangelical theology, piety, and practice has come to be dominated by various species of what are really expressions of the original Anabaptist theology, piety, and practice in the sixteenth century. They were . . . Continue reading →

Office Hours: The Holy Spirit And Sola Scriptura

Office Hours

One of the dominant trends in global Christianity is the growth of the Pentecostal and the Charismatic movements. A 2011 study published by the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion and Public Life says that more than 500 million Christians globally identify . . . Continue reading →

Manton: Lent Is Just Another Phony Tradition

That they [Romanists] cry up a private, unproved, unwritten tradition of their own, as of equal authority with this safe and full rule, which is contained in this written Word of God. Their crime and fault may be considered, partly with respect . . . Continue reading →

Pentecostalism Is Not New

Montanism was a second-century movement whose leader Montanus claimed to receive direct revelation from God. In addition, two of his “prophetesses,” Priscilla and Maximilla also claimed to receive such revelation. Such revelations were often accompanied by strange behavior. When Montanus had these . . . Continue reading →