Audio: Gospel-Driven Life—Means of Grace

R. Scott Clark speaks at the Spring Theology Conference of the Reformation Society of Oregon (May 2009). Editor’s Note: This audio was originally published in 2009.  RESOURCES Subscribe To The Heidelblog! The Heidelblog Resource Page Heidelmedia Resources The Ecumenical Creeds The Reformed . . . Continue reading →

Audio: Gospel-Driven Life—Union With Christ

R. Scott Clark speaks at the Spring Theology Conference of the Reformation Society of Oregon (May 2009). Editor’s Note: This audio was originally published in 2009.  RESOURCES Subscribe To The Heidelblog! The Heidelblog Resource Page Heidelmedia Resources The Ecumenical Creeds The Reformed . . . Continue reading →

Review: Arminius and the Reformed Tradition: Grace and the Doctrine of Salvation By J. V. Fesko

In his work Arminius and the Reformed Tradition: Grace and the Doctrine of Salvation, J. V. Fesko, the Harriet Barbour Professor of Systematic and Historical Theology at Reformed Theological Seminary, Jackson, Mississippi, makes a narrow yet explosive claim—namely, that Jacob Arminius’s (1560–1609) . . . Continue reading →

Vos: Don’t Give Stones For Bread

In the Judaistic controversy which shook the early church, forces and tendencies were at work deeply rooted in the sinful human heart. In modernized apparel they confront us still to the present day. There are still abroad forms of a Christless Gospel. . . . Continue reading →

Perkins: Salvation, All Of It, Is By Grace Alone, Through Faith Alone

William Perkins

As part of my response to the claim that some Reformed orthodox theologians taught that salvation was not only in two stages but also, in some way, through works, I appealed to a quotation from William Perkins. I could have written much . . . Continue reading →

Should We Allow Wesleyans To Narrate The Reformed Tradition For Us (Or Why We Are Not Finally Saved Through Good Works) Part 2

Further, salvation includes three aspects: justification (i.e., God’s judicial declaration that believers are righteous), sanctification (i.e., God’s progressive and gracious work in conforming believers to the likeness of Christ), and glorification. If any aspect of salvation is said to be through good . . . Continue reading →

Should We Allow Wesleyans To Narrate The Reformed Tradition For Us (Or Why We Are Not Finally Saved Through Good Works) Part 1

Perhaps the most important paragraphs in Rhyne Putman’s recent review of a new volume attempting to relate good works to salvation appear near the end (16 paragraphs in): One theological topic closely related to good works and salvation is conspicuously absent in . . . Continue reading →

Beza: No Good Works Can Save You

Therefore, this is our thesis:  No good works of the regenerate, even which are most excellent before others from themselves or in themselves, can endure the judgment of God, because they are imperfect, impure, and mixed with vice, and therefore they have . . . Continue reading →