Roger Nicole On Amyraut’s Testimony At Alençon (1637)

1. Naturally enough, in the explanations they gave, Amyraut and Testard sought to conform their presentation and language as closely as they could to the traditional Reformed views without making an outright disavowal of their previously printed sentiments. It would be difficult . . . Continue reading →

Office Hours: What Happened To Reformed Orthodoxy? (2)

Office Hours

In the well-researched and written volume, Calvin Meets Voltaire: The Clergy of Geneva during the Age of Enlightenment, 1685-1798, Eighteenth-Century Studies Series (Ashgate: 2014), Jennifer Powell McNutt argued that there was more continuity, than has sometimes been thought, between 18th-century Genevan theology, piety, . . . Continue reading →

Office Hours: What Happened To Reformed Orthodoxy? (1)

Office Hours

In the well-researched and written volume, Calvin Meets Voltaire: The Clergy of Geneva during the Age of Enlightenment, 1685-1798, Eighteenth-Century Studies Series (Ashgate: 2014), Jennifer Powell McNutt argued that there was more continuity, than has sometimes been thought, between 18th-century Genevan theology, . . . Continue reading →

Office Hours: Calvin And Voltaire

Office Hours

When most of us think about the history of Reformed theology, if we think about it at all, we tend to think first of Calvin and then we typically jump to Jonathan Edwards, then perhaps to Princeton and thence to our own . . . Continue reading →

New In Translation: The Synopsis Of A Purer Theology

When I began reading Reformed theology in university Calvin was virtually the only sixteenth-century Reformed author widely available in English translation. The other authors I read were all from the 19th and 20th centuries (e.g., Hodge, Warfield, Van Til, Murray). In the . . . Continue reading →

Reformed Orthodoxy On Holiness Of The Spirit

The Spirit, further, is called “Holy” because, on the one hand, of “his unsullied purity and glorious majesty”—not, however, as if he were holier than the Father and the Son, for all are holy and “the divine holiness, being infinite, does not . . . Continue reading →

Now In English: Junius On True Theology

Lambert Daneau (1530–95) described Franciscus Junius as “a man of singular learning”—and that he was. His biblical scholarship was cited widely by writers from a variety of traditions in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. His influence on the Reformed tradition has been . . . Continue reading →

Johannes Marckius On Witsius’ Embassy To England

…He had always the preference given him in their synods, and was twice honored with the supreme government and headship of the university; namely, in the years 1686, and 1697. Nor must we omit, that when, in the year 1685, the states . . . Continue reading →

If Only Someone Would Translate These…

The Heidelblog is devoted to recovering the Reformed confession. In this context the word confession has two senses. In the first sense it refers to the official, ecclesiastical, public, constitutional documents to which ministers and elders subscribe and to which members of . . . Continue reading →

Samuel Bolton’s Survey Of Opinion On The Mosaic Covenant

My friend and colleague Mike Brown published a revision of his excellent MA (Historical Theology) thesis (Westminster Seminary California) in 2012 as Christ and the Condition: The Covenant Theology of Samuel Petto (1624-1711). As part of the background to explaining Petto, Mike . . . Continue reading →

New Article: Law And Gospel In Early Reformed Orthodoxy

Richard Muller recently celebrated his 65th birthday to mark that occasion and as part the 20th anniversary of the PhD program at Calvin Seminary, he was presented with a Festschrift (celebration book) in his honor. Jordan Ballor has the details on Opuscula . . . Continue reading →