1930 Or 2017?

The enemy is made the more dangerous because it is found within, rather than without, the Church. Definite opponents of the Christian religion could have been more easily met; but now as in ancient times Satan has preferred to labor for the . . . Continue reading →

A Wonderful Illustration Of The Necessity Of An Objective Definition Of Reformed

Recovering the Reformed Confession

Trevin Wax and David Fitch have been in a dialogue in which each of them has published a post expressing appreciation for the other’s tradition. Wax identifies as Reformed and Fitch as Anabaptist. The reader can draw his own conclusions as to . . . Continue reading →

A Friendly Reply To Derek Regarding Calvin, Luther, And The Falling Of The Church

You can catch up with the flow of the discussion via Derek Rishmawy’s interesting essay but the short story is that Carl Trueman published an essay at First Things properly cautioning American evangelicals about re-making Luther into their own image and challenging . . . Continue reading →

The Power And Influence Of The Evangelical Top Men

The economy of evangelical power is complicated but I want to highlight just two aspects today, aspects which have been critical in the recent discussion and which have a profound doctrinal significance. First, there is the fact that the same narrow gene . . . Continue reading →

How Reformed Orthodoxy Was Lost

J. A. Turretin’s struggle against the Consensus, in which he achieved victory in 1705, was, therefore, part of an effort for an inclusive Protestant fellowship. He did not press the issues raised in earlier discussions—predestination, imputation of original sin, the presence of . . . Continue reading →

Why American Evangelicals Convert To And Imitate Rome

Some 57,400 American Protestants converted to Roman Catholicism between 1831 and 1860… Protestants reacted strongly to such Catholic proselytizing. They attributed the Catholics’ success in part to the cultural appeal of their imagery and art. Accordingly, Protestants began to make use themselves . . . Continue reading →

The Strange Familiarity Of Socinianism

Each fall I lead a course in which we read some great texts of Reformed orthodoxy and scholasticism. This week we turned our attention to John Owen’s response to Socinianism. We’re focusing our attention on chapter 7 of his response to the . . . Continue reading →

The Next Big Church Thing

The following is a guest post by Dan Borvan. He is a DPhil candidate in Oxford University. He holds degrees from Westminster Seminary California and Oxford University. He is Under Care of the Midwest Presbytery of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church. He lives . . . Continue reading →

Yes There Is A Reformed Doctrine Of Justification

Recently I responded to John Armstrong’s post on the TIME magazine new Calvinist discussion. In his reply, John makes this startling claim: There is no monolithic Reformed voice on justification (especially re: imputation) and I would be very happy if we allowed a . . . Continue reading →

Heidelcast 67: Recovering Mother Kirk

Heidelcast

Before there was Recovering the Reformed Confession, there was Recovering Mother Kirk a seminal book for all Reformed confessionalists who are looking for a way between revivalism and fundamentalism or between QIRC and QIRE. Darryl Hart published Recovering Mother Kirk just over . . . Continue reading →

Why Did Arminianism “Win”?

Sometime back Howard wrote to ask, “How and when did Arminianism become the predominate view?” That’s a good question. First, we should distinguish between Jacob Arminius (James Hermanzoon) and the Arminians (or the Remonstrants). Relative to the conclusions Arminian/Remonstrant theology later reached, Arminius . . . Continue reading →