The Reformed Churches: We Distinguish But Do Not Separate The Two Natures Of Christ

Question 17. Why must he in one person be also very God? That he might, by the power of his Godhead, sustain, in his human nature, the burden of God’s wrath; and might obtain for and restore to us, righteousness and life. . . . Continue reading →

Why Do Christians Do Good Works?

86. Since then we are redeemed from our misery by grace through Christ, without any merit of ours, why should we do good works? Because Christ, having redeemed us by His blood, also renews us by His Holy Spirit after His own . . . Continue reading →

Heidelberg 62: Works No Part Of Our Justification

Because the popular rhetoric in evangelical and even in confessional Protestant circles has frequently been that the medieval (or the Roman communion) taught justification by works and the Reformers taught justification by grace well-meaning but misguided Christians sometimes conclude that so long . . . Continue reading →

Heidelberg 35: Of The Virgin Mary

Reformed Christians are understandably ambivalent about the Virgin Mary. On the one hand she was truly blessed. God graciously ordained that she should bear in her womb God the Son, that she would be what the Definition of Chalcedon (451) called the . . . Continue reading →

Heidelberg 33: God’s Eternally And Only Begotten Son And His Adopted Sons (2)

In part 1 we took a quick trip through the fundamentals of Christology: one person, two natures. Any doctrine of Christ that confuses the two natures (Eutychianism) or that makes them into two persons (Nestorianism) is heresy. It denies fundamental, biblical, catholic . . . Continue reading →

Heidelberg 32: He Is The Savior And We Are The Saved (8)

In this series we’ve been working through Heidelberg Catechism Lord’s Day 12 (Q/A 31 and 32) and its fundamental distinction between the believer and the Savior. We have noted some ways that evangelicals have blurred the line between Christ and Christian but . . . Continue reading →