Sola Scriptura Protects Christian Liberty

In April 1521, when Martin Luther stood before the powers of this world at the Diet of Worms, he did so on the basis of  the sole, unique, and final authority of God’s Word. Luther confessed that his conscience was bound by . . . Continue reading →

Office Hours Season 8: What’s In A Word? Sola Gratia

Office Hours Video

In confessional Protestant circles we use some short hand Latin phrases that we might not all understand, even though we use them frequently. Sola gratia is one of those. These expressions go back to the very beginning of the Reformation. Andreas Bodenstein . . . Continue reading →

Office Hours Season 8: Reformation 500—Backgrounds

Office Hours Video

This is season 8 of Office Hours and we are celebrating the 500th anniversary of the Reformation. In this episode we look  at the background to the Reformation in the medieval church, how the medieval church set the stage for the Reformation . . . Continue reading →

A Friendly Reply To Derek Regarding Calvin, Luther, And The Falling Of The Church

You can catch up with the flow of the discussion via Derek Rishmawy’s interesting essay but the short story is that Carl Trueman published an essay at First Things properly cautioning American evangelicals about re-making Luther into their own image and challenging . . . Continue reading →

Identity Markers: Why Some Axioms Persist

Peter Berger has been an influential and important sociologist of religion for more than 50 years. He is presently Professor Emeritus of Religion, Sociology and Theology and Director of the Institute on Culture, Religion, and World Affairs at Boston University. To review a . . . Continue reading →

Before the Word-Faith Hucksters

Before the modern Word-Faith (“name it and claim it” or “health and wealth”) preachers there was a huckster named Johann Tetzel (1465–1519). He is famous for his marketing of the medieval practice of selling indulgences with the jingle, “When the coin in . . . Continue reading →

Refo500

Planning is under way for the celebration of the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation. I have my doubts about 1517 as the best date to remember (but apparently Protestants were talking about 1517 as the beginning of the Reformation in the 17th . . . Continue reading →