If We May Pray Uninspired Words, Why May We Not Sing Them?

What the Fathers called the “rule of faith” (which included both doctrine and practice) and what Calvin called the “rule of worship” Christians in the Presbyterian and Reformed tradition have called the “regulative principle of worship” since the mid-20th century. That rule, . . . Continue reading →

Resources On Prayer

D. C. McAllister’s excellent essay in The Federalist this morning and a question from regular HB reader Clinton suggests that a resource post on prayer might be helpful: Audio: The Role of Prayer in Sanctification Audio: The Pilgrim’s Prayer (1) Audio: The . . . Continue reading →

But Deliver Us From The Evil One

Whoever has God for his friend will find Satan to be his enemy. He receives the name of Satan, first, because he is the adversary of God himself; and next, because he is the adversary of those whom God honors with his . . . Continue reading →

Heidelberg 126: Justified Sinners Pray For Forgiveness Of Sins

One of the most persistent temptations Christians face is that of turning the covenant of grace into a covenant of works. As we pray we must always be reminded that we, who trust in Jesus Christ as our substitute and Mediator, are . . . Continue reading →

Heidelberg 125: Trusting And Asking Our Father To Provide

We are often tempted to set asking and trusting against each other but, of course, it is a false choice. When a child asks his Dad for breakfast he trusts that his father can provide. It does not occur to him to . . . Continue reading →

Heidelberg 123: The Second Petition—Your Kingdom Come (2)

We have already seen some of the difficulties that come with both an over-realized and under-realized eschatology. In contrast to both we should see that the Gospel of Mark presents our Lord Jesus as proclaiming neither a fully realized, earthly kingdom nor . . . Continue reading →

Heidelberg 118–119: We Ask For All Necessities

I grew up on the Plains. It is not easy for Plainsmen to ask for help. The Plains are the home of rugged individualism, which was a very useful trait for settlers who turned over ground for the first time. Farms were . . . Continue reading →