Audio: A Palace, A Prince, and A Point

A sermon by R. Scott Clark entitled, “A Palace, a Prince, and a Point” Editor’s note: This audio was originally published in 2011.  RESOURCES Subscribe To The Heidelblog! The Heidelblog Resource Page Heidelmedia Resources The Ecumenical Creeds The Reformed Confessions The Heidelberg . . . Continue reading →

Murray: We Don’t Peek Behind The Curtain

God has mercy on whom he wills and whom he wills he hardens. Some are vessels for wrath, others for mercy. And ultimate destiny is envisioned in destruction and glory. But this differentiation is God’s action and prerogative, not man’s. And, because . . . Continue reading →

The Gospel According To John (MacArthur)—Part 21

MacArthur is right to observe that too many evangelicals have no place for good works in their account of the faith. The question is not whether there is a “relationship between faith and works,” but rather what that relationship is.216 According to . . . Continue reading →

The Gospel According To John (MacArthur)—Part 20

The formal question of the Protestant Reformation was that of authority: What is the principal source of authority for the Christian faith and the Christian life? The Roman communion claimed that the church produced the Scriptures and thus the authority of the . . . Continue reading →

Audio: The Reality Of God’s Love For Sinners: John 3:16

R. Scott Clark speaks on John 3:16 at Westminster Seminary California. Editor’s note: This audio was originally published by the Westminster Seminary California in 2014.  RESOURCES Subscribe To The Heidelblog! The Heidelblog Resource Page Heidelmedia Resources The Ecumenical Creeds The Reformed Confessions . . . Continue reading →

The Gospel According To John (MacArthur)—Part 19

“Most of the current controversy regarding the gospel hinges on the definitions of a few key words, including repentance, faith, discipleship, and Lord.”186 So writes John MacArthur in his chapter on repentance.187 He notes that our Lord’s preaching of the Kingdom of . . . Continue reading →

Vos: Don’t Give Stones For Bread

In the Judaistic controversy which shook the early church, forces and tendencies were at work deeply rooted in the sinful human heart. In modernized apparel they confront us still to the present day. There are still abroad forms of a Christless Gospel. . . . Continue reading →

The Gospel According To John (MacArthur)—Part 18

Throughout this series, however it might seem to devoted fans of John MacArthur, I have endeavored to be honest and fair—both of which require me to acknowledge, as I have before, that chapters 14 and 15 are quite edifying. The beginning of . . . Continue reading →

The Gospel According To John (MacArthur)—Part 17

Dispensationalism is as much a theory of the church as it is of dispensations. Or rather, dispensationalism divides humanity into three distinct groups: Israel, the church, and the nations. The first two are in covenant with God. Israel has the starring role . . . Continue reading →

The Gospel According To John (MacArthur)—Part 16

In MacArthur’s account of the parables of the kingdom of God, the nature of saving faith, and in his use of sources, we face three interesting sets of questions and some recurring problems in chapter 13 of The Gospel According to Jesus. . . . Continue reading →

Should We Allow Wesleyans To Narrate The Reformed Tradition For Us (Or Why We Are Not Finally Saved Through Good Works) Part 2

Further, salvation includes three aspects: justification (i.e., God’s judicial declaration that believers are righteous), sanctification (i.e., God’s progressive and gracious work in conforming believers to the likeness of Christ), and glorification. If any aspect of salvation is said to be through good . . . Continue reading →

Should We Allow Wesleyans To Narrate The Reformed Tradition For Us (Or Why We Are Not Finally Saved Through Good Works) Part 1

Perhaps the most important paragraphs in Rhyne Putman’s recent review of a new volume attempting to relate good works to salvation appear near the end (16 paragraphs in): One theological topic closely related to good works and salvation is conspicuously absent in . . . Continue reading →