A Delightful Reformed Guide To Your Devotions: Be Thou My Vision

Be Thou My Vision: A Liturgy for Daily Worship (Wheaton: Crossway, 2021) is a delightful surprise. Edited by Jonathan Gibson it is arranged in a cycle of 31 days and on each day it includes: A call to worship, Words of adoration, A reading . . . Continue reading →

What Is Prayer?

Prayer consists in calling upon the true God, and arises from an acknowledgment and sense of our want, and from a desire of sharing in the divine bounty, in true conversion of heart and confidence in the promise of grace for the . . . Continue reading →

The “Opium Of The People” And The Opioid Crisis (2)

The late-modern period is a a time of disillusionment in the West and perhaps nowhere else is that disillusionment more acute than in America where, since at the least the early 20th century, the false promises of Modernity (human perfectibility, the universal . . . Continue reading →

The Translation Of The Lord’s Prayer Is Not A Mere Convention

Francis, the Bishop of Rome (who claims to be the universal vicar of Christ on the earth) has recently announced his opinion that the translation of the sixth petition of the Lord’s Prayer should be revised. Anthony Esolen has published a terrific . . . Continue reading →

Resources On Prayer

D. C. McAllister’s excellent essay in The Federalist and a question from regular HB reader Clinton suggests that a resource post on prayer might be helpful: Audio Audio: The Role of Prayer in Sanctification Audio: The Pilgrim’s Prayer (1) Audio: The Pilgrim’s Prayer . . . Continue reading →

Heidelberg 128: The Doxology

We might first associate the word doxology with the song often sung at the close of public worship services but it is, in fact, two Greek words (δόξᾰ + λογία), which was taken over into medieval Latin and thence into English in . . . Continue reading →

But Deliver Us From The Evil One

Whoever has God for his friend will find Satan to be his enemy. He receives the name of Satan, first, because he is the adversary of God himself; and next, because he is the adversary of those whom God honors with his . . . Continue reading →