The Rejection of Errors (2): The Antithesis and Eschatology

In the first post in this series I connected the Rejection of Errors adopted at the Synod of Dort (1619) with the Reformed doctrine of “antithesis” between belief and unbelief. To put that doctrine in some context I offered a brief overview . . . Continue reading →

Brothers We Are Not Perfectionists

Introduction In the doctrine of sanctification there are several errors to be avoided. First, let’s define our terms and understand what the basic biblical (and confessional Reformed) doctrine of sanctification is. The verb “to sanctify” is Latin. It is the word from . . . Continue reading →

We Condemn Jewish Dreams Of A Golden Age

THE SECTS. We therefore condemn all who deny a real resurrection of the flesh (II Tim. 2:18), or who with John of Jerusalem, against whom Jerome wrote, do not have a correct view of the glorification of bodies. We also condemn those . . . Continue reading →

What’s Wrong With A Theology Of Glory?

At the 1518 Heidelberg Disputation (academic presentation), Martin Luther (1483–1546), the father of the Protestant Reformation, as he was coming to his Protestant convictions, argued: “One is not worthy to be called a theologian who looks upon the ‘invisible things of God’ . . . Continue reading →

What Is Wrong With The Theology Of Glory?

At the 1518 Heidelberg Disputation (academic presentation), Martin Luther (1483–1546), the father of the Protestant Reformation, as he was coming to his Protestant convictions, argued: “One is not worthy to be called a theologian who looks upon the ‘invisible things of God’ . . . Continue reading →

Stop Blaming Your Problems On Luther

…Yet I dissent from Chalk’s genealogy of modernity. He goes on to argue that this notion of the autonomous, emotivist self can be traced to Martin Luther. In part this is because Chalk depends upon Jacques Maritain’s Three Reformers: Luther, Descartes, Rousseau . . . Continue reading →

Stemming Another Rising Tide Of Theonomy: Hebrews 7:11–14 (1): Background

When the theonomy movement initially began to gain steam, Jimmy Carter, a Southern Baptist who had campaigned as a “born again” Christian, was part way through his first and only term in the White House. Three years before that, the Supreme Court . . . Continue reading →