Office Hours: Who Is Jesus?

Office Hours Video

Until very recently most people probably had some idea who they thought Jesus is. The Jews regarded him as a traitorous blasphemer. Muslims regard him as a failed prophet (who did not die nor was raised) who was succeeded by Mohammad. Liberal . . . Continue reading →

Strangers And Aliens (23b): Cross Now, Glory Later (1 Peter 5:6–11)

poussin-1634-crossing-red-sea

The Christians of Asia Minor were being tested under difficult circumstances. They were being challenged and even harassed because of their Christian faith. We know that some of them were slaves and faced the temptation of disobeying unjust masters. It is not difficult for us to imagine how Christians were regarded by a surrounding culture that was largely pagan because that is the world in which you and I now live. We know that the Christians were misunderstood as being arrogant because they refused to go along with established Greco-Roman religious worship. They could not acknowledge Caesar (just now, Nero) as a deity. Their worship was misunderstood, misinterpreted, and misrepresented. In the second century they were suspected of being a death cult because of their talk about Jesus’ death, of worshiping the cross—which would have provoked the Romans particularly to disgust—because of their theology of the cross. We know that later they were accused of cannibalism because of the Christian doctrine that, in the Lord’s Supper, by the mysterious operation of the Spirit, the risen Christ feeds believers with his body and blood. Beyond all this, doubtless they had or would soon have news of the lies told about the Christians by Caesar and their martyrdom at Caesar’s hands in Rome. Continue reading →

Calvin’s Debt To Luther

On the other hand, a glance at the first edition of Calvin’s Institutes, already published in 1536, is sufficient to prove that he was deeply indebted to Luther, and this, no doubt promised better things. Quite apart from the fact, often pointed . . . Continue reading →

Teaching The Old Fashioned Way

And that is why I love teaching the old way, the way that is driven by a metaphysical conviction about the world and about truth. For me, this kind of teaching is an act of rebellion in this present age—an attempt in . . . Continue reading →