A New Reformed Congregation In Ventura, CA

I am thankful to introduce Ventura Reformed to readers of the Heidelblog! In April, Pasadena URC called and sent me to three households in the city of Ventura to lead them in a grassroots church-planting project. We are asking the Lord to establish a URCNA congregation on the Oxnard Plain (population ~ 400,000) not only with Reformed-and-relocating people, and with Christians-becoming-Reformed people, but especially—especially!—with people who do not attend any church. Continue reading →

Discovering The Reformed Confession: Keith Giles Moves From Hal Lindsey To The Heidelberg Catechism

I was born and brought up in London, England and my family were faithful members of the Open Brethren churches, who count as part of their history the great George Müller and the martyr, Jim Elliot; firmly premillennial, dispensational, ‘no creed but the Bible’ and credobaptist with many other idiosyncrasies thrown in! I moved to Coventry in the Midlands of England for college and stayed in that area afterwards, involved in a variety of evangelistic efforts and youth work. I even remember one summer teaching faithfully at a Bible class with all the charts and without any doubt, the end times according to Hal Lindsey! Continue reading →

Madison Reformed: Bringing Reformed Theology, Piety, And Practice To Southern Indiana

In 1850, a former slave named William J. Anderson built a church building in downtown Madison, Indiana. Anderson had escaped the clutches of slavery and made it just across the Ohio River into Madison. He became a conductor on the Underground Railroad and, . . . Continue reading →

A New URCNA Congregation Forming In Norfolk, VA

Here in Norfolk, VA, the Lord is working to build His Church. In the summer of 2021, a group of families began meeting regularly to study the Heidelberg Catechism and the Bible together. Over the next few months, these families met with . . . Continue reading →

Principal Place: A Pragmatic Plea For Psalmody

The Modern church has earned a dubious distinction: we live in the most psalm-less period in the history of the church. A Quick History Of Psalmlessness We know that the Jews sang psalms. We know that our Lord sang psalms with his . . . Continue reading →