Office Hours: Aquinas Among The Protestants

Office Hours Video

Thomas Aquinas (c.1224–74) was one of the most important Christian teachers in the period and though he was eclipsed in the centuries after, his work returned to prominence in the 16th–19th centuries particularly among Roman theologians, for whom Thomas became the theologian . . . Continue reading →

The Legal-Eschatological Religion And Racism

2017 is a “Reformation Year.” It is the 500th anniversary of Luther’s 95 Theses and an opportunity to remember the Reformation basics. One of those is the distinction between law and gospel. One of the five most basic distinctions Luther recovered for . . . Continue reading →

Jerome On Silence And Piety

Where there is the beating of drums, the noise and clatter of pipe and lute, the clanging of cymbals, can any of fear God be found? Jerome, The Perpetual Virginity of the Blessed Virgin, §22.

One Like The Son Of God

But I see four men free, walking in the midst of the fire, and they are not hurt; and the appearance of the fourth is like the Son of God. Daniel 3:25

A “Rest” To Be Resisted: Resting From The Sabbath

Passion City, an evangelical congregation in Atlanta founded in 2009 by Louie Giglio (whom the reader may remember from the inauguration controversy), announced this week that the congregation will be taking a Sabbath from the Sabbath this Lord’s Day and the next. . . . Continue reading →

Houston, We Do Have A Problem

The traditional definition of racism, the definition that I learned as a boy and that was generally accepted until recently is this: racism (rāˌsizəm) noun. prejudice, discrimination, or antagonism directed against someone of a different race based on the belief that one’s . . . Continue reading →

Concerns About The Rhetoric: “X Is A Gospel Issue”

The Good news is the message that Jesus Christ is God the Son incarnate, who obeyed in the place of his people, suffered for them, was crucified, dead, and buried for them, was raised for their justification, and is coming again. We . . . Continue reading →