The Myth Of The Isolated Scholar

There is a myth about academic life that it is a solitary endeavor. Imagine lonely, stoic figures plodding single-file into a library to sit for hours, hidden behind walled study carrels, isolated and free from social distractions, a hushed silence strictly observed. . . . Continue reading →

Office Hours: Death In Adam, Life In Christ

Office Hours Video

On social media it has become common for evangelical Christians to identify themselves as “imputationalist.” This is interesting because the doctrine of imputation, the teaching that our sins of believers are reckoned to Christ and his righteousness is credited to believers, was . . . Continue reading →

Boy Scouts 1948 Versus Boy Scouts 2017

One of the books I loved most as a boy was my uncle’s copy of the Boy Scout, Handbook for Boys (1948). I loved it because it connected me with my Dad, to my uncle (a lifeguard and a marine), and to . . . Continue reading →

With The Regular Reformed Guys On QIRC And QIRE

Long ago, in a galaxy far away, Recovering the Reformed Confession was published and there I argued that confessional Reformed theology, piety, and practice has two competitors, unwelcome guests, if you will: the Quest for Illegitimate Religious Certainty (QIRC) and the Quest . . . Continue reading →

Does The Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed Require Baptismal Regeneration?

HB reader Mike asks whether this language requires Reformed believers to confess that baptism necessarily regenerates, i.e., is new life necessarily conferred at the moment of administration. It is widely claimed that “the ancient church taught baptismal regeneration.” In this context “regeneration” . . . Continue reading →

Are You With Zwickau Or Wittenberg?

Late in 1521, Karlstadt and Zwilling started to drive the Wittenberg reformation in a radical direction. Stirring up iconoclasm and riots, Karlstadt took to walking around Wittenberg dressed as a peasant and officiating at mass in a plain robe. Then three individuals . . . Continue reading →

Sola Scriptura Protects Christian Liberty

In April 1521, when Martin Luther stood before the powers of this world at the Diet of Worms, he did so on the basis of  the sole, unique, and final authority of God’s Word. Luther confessed that his conscience was bound by . . . Continue reading →