Buchanan: The Law Was Not Relaxed But Republished

If the original law required perfect obedience, could it be abrogated, or even relaxed, otherwise than by God’s authority? If it was not abrogated, but republished, at Sinai, was it relaxed by Christ, when He repeated it, saying, ‘Thou shalt love the . . . Continue reading →

Boston: WCF 19 Teaches Republication

That the conditional promise (Lev 18:5, to which agrees Exodus 19:8) and the dreadful threatening (Deut 27:26), were both given to the Israelites, as well as the ten commands, is beyond question; and that according to the apostle (Rom. 10:5, Gal. 3:10), . . . Continue reading →

Seven Short Points About Republication

The (re)republication of a book on the question of the republication of the covenant of works under Moses has hit the Reformed interwebs. Follow the link above for quotes from Reformed sources, audio, and posts explaining the history, the current controversy, and . . . Continue reading →

Samuel Bolton’s Survey Of Opinion On The Mosaic Covenant

My friend and colleague Mike Brown published a revision of his excellent MA (Historical Theology) thesis (Westminster Seminary California) in 2012 as Christ and the Condition: The Covenant Theology of Samuel Petto (1624-1711). As part of the background to explaining Petto, Mike . . . Continue reading →

Heidelcast 50: Making Some Sense Of The Republication Debate Pt 3: With Chris Gordon

Heidelcast

Beginning at least in the 1560s, it was non-controversial for Reformed theologians to teach that God, before the fall, entered into a legal, probationary covenant with Adam, who was the representative of the whole human race, the condition of which was perfect . . . Continue reading →

Heidelcast 48: Making Some Sense Of The Republication Debate Pt 1: History

Heidelcast

Parts of the confessional Reformed world in North America are in the midst of a controversy over whether it is biblical, confessional, and historically Reformed to teach that the Mosaic covenant was, in some sense, a republication of the covenant of works. . . . Continue reading →