New: Reformed Covenant Theology: A Systematic Introduction By Harrison Perkins

Covenant is an unavoidably and obviously important category in Scripture. Throughout the history of the church, beginning in the very earliest years of the post-apostolic church, there have been numerous attempts to account for the covenants, but it was not until the . . . Continue reading →

Baptists, The Definition Of Reformed, And Identity Politics (Part 3)

If the objective, historical evidence is as clear as I claim about the historic definition of the word Reformed, why does this debate even exist? Again, the roots of this debate are partly to be found in the way Baptists think of themselves and others, particularly in the USA. Continue reading →

Baptists, The Definition Of Reformed, And Identity Politics (Part 2)

In part one, we began a survey of Reformed statements to demonstrate how the Reformed and the Baptists are two different traditions with distinctly separate understandings of redemptive history. Theodore Beza’s personal confession of faith (Confession De Foi Du Chretien, 1559) was . . . Continue reading →

Video: The Abraham Paradigm

Friday and Saturday of this past week I had the privilege of speaking to congregation of Covenant Presbyterian Church (OPC) and to their guests in Ft Worth, TX on “The Abraham Paradigm.” They were very gracious and patient with me. It is . . . Continue reading →

John Owen Did Not Read Hebrews Like A Baptist (Part 4)

In volume three, where Owen begins his commentary proper on the text of Hebrews, he makes illuminating remarks on Hebrews 3:1–2, about how he understood the movement of redemptive history and the comparison and contrast that Paul makes in Hebrews between Moses . . . Continue reading →

John Owen Did Not Read Hebrews Like A Baptist (Part 3)

It is a small thing—so small that it might go unnoticed—but as in Exercitation VI, in Exercitation XIX where Owen considered the “State and Ordinances of the Church Before the Giving of the Law,” he consistently spoke of the “Jewish church.”1 To . . . Continue reading →

John Owen Did Not Read Hebrews Like A Baptist (Part 2)

In his exercitation on “the oneness of the church” Owen argued seven points. Each and all of them were in the service of what Reformed theology calls the unity of the covenant of grace. For Owen and the mainstream of Reformed orthodoxy, . . . Continue reading →

John Owen Did Not Read Hebrews Like A Baptist (Part 1)

It is the habit of some of our Particular Baptist friends to imply, suggest, or even to say plainly that the great English Reformed theologian John Owen (1616–1683) was practically Baptist in his covenant theology.1 He is arguably one of the greatest theologians . . . Continue reading →

Review: The Binding of God: Calvin’s Role in the Development of Covenant Theology by Peter A. Lillback

Whether Calvin was a covenant theologian has been a matter of considerable confusion and controversy in modern Calvin studies. The answer to this question has usually been determined by whether one considers the rise of covenant theology a positive or negative development, . . . Continue reading →

Abraham, Moses, and Baptism

I am in the midst of an interesting discussion of baptism with a friend. This friend has Baptist convictions, yet he understands Reformed theology better than many of the Reformed. He is quite sympathetic to historic and confessional Reformed theology. For example, . . . Continue reading →