About Harrison Perkins

Harrison Perkins (PhD, Queen’s University Belfast; MDiv, Westminster Seminary California) is pastor of Oakland Hills Community Church (OPC), a visiting lecturer in systematic theology at Edinburgh Theological Seminary, Online Faculty in church history for Westminster Theological Seminary, and the author of Catholicity and the Covenant of Works: James Ussher and the Reformed Tradition (Oxford University Press, 2020). Meet all the Heidelberg contributors»

Keep Yourselves in God’s Love––An Exposition of Jude’s Epistle (9): Lean Not On Your Own Wisdom

Nevertheless in like manner also these false teachers by being dreamers, on the one hand defile the flesh, but also rebel against authority, but further blaspheme the glorious angels. 9Now, Michael the archangel, while deliberating with the devil, disputed about Moses’ body, . . . Continue reading →

Keep Yourselves in God’s Love––An Exposition of Jude’s Epistle (8): The Lord’s Word is Better than Our Own

Nevertheless in like manner also these false teachers by being dreamers, on the one hand defile the flesh, but also rebel against authority, but further blaspheme the glorious angels. Jude 8 (author’s translation) GPS, especially as we have it on our phones, . . . Continue reading →

Review of Tadataka Maruyama, Calvin’s Ecclesiology: A Study in the History of Doctrine

There are too many treatments of particular aspects of John Calvin’s theology. The proliferation of books and articles of course relates to Calvin’s large and varied writing corpus as well as his ongoing popularity, especially growing throughout the twentieth century. The problem . . . Continue reading →

Keep Yourselves In God’s Love—Jude’s Epistle (Part 1)

Introduction

Most Christians probably know that Jude’s epistle is in the New Testament. Many know that it comes directly before the book of Revelation. Some have read it. A few have studied it carefully. For a long time, Jude’s epistle was basically ignored . . . Continue reading →

A Response to Brent E. Parker and Richard J. Lucas (eds.), Covenantal and Dispensational Theologies: Four Views on the Continuity of Scripture (Part 3)

This is the final installment of a three-part review of Brent Parker and Richard Lucas’ new volume of essays wherein theologians representing traditional Reformed covenant theology, progressive covenantalism, progressive dispensationalism, and traditional dispensationalism interact on issues of continuity and discontinuity in redemptive . . . Continue reading →

A Response to Brent E. Parker and Richard J. Lucas (eds.), Covenantal and Dispensational Theologies: Four Views on the Continuity of Scripture (Part 2)

This three-part series reviews the new multi-view collection of essays, edited by Richard Lucas and Brent Parker, concerning the unity of redemptive history as expressed in various forms of covenantal and dispensational theologies. Part one considered Michael Horton’s argument for traditional Reformed . . . Continue reading →

A Response to Brent E. Parker and Richard J. Lucas (eds.), Covenantal and Dispensational Theologies: Four Views on the Continuity of Scripture (Part 1)

At my ordination, I took a vow that I hold the Westminster Standards “as containing the system of doctrine taught in the Holy Scriptures,” expressing that these documents summarize the shape of biblical truth most accurately. This “system” of doctrine connects various . . . Continue reading →

Review: Bully Pulpit: Confronting the Problem of Spiritual Abuse in the Church by Michael J. Kruger

Michael Kruger has written a gem of a book, addressing one of the most prominent issues troubling the church today. Increasingly, we are faced with stories about pastors who misuse their position of authority to achieve their own selfish ends to the . . . Continue reading →

Review: Petrus van Mastricht’s Theoretical-Practical Theology Volume 3: The Works of God and the Fall of Man

Although it is bad practice to believe in golden ages in the absolute sense, the present is certainly a high point for the church in the specific sense of the English-speaking world gaining increasing access to rich material from Protestant Orthodoxy that . . . Continue reading →

Resources on the Means of Grace

Over the last few years, I have given increased thought toward God’s ordinary means of grace. That designation itself is worth reflection, by which I have recently come to be thoroughly amazed. First, the means are God’s. They belong to him and . . . Continue reading →

Review: Todd Hains, Martin Luther and the Rule of Faith: Reading God’s Word for God’s People

Not long ago, Reformed circles found it fashionable to criticize those on the other side of our intramural debates as being too Lutheran. If being too Lutheran means thinking anything like Todd Hains and reading Scripture with the care and purpose for . . . Continue reading →

Review of Brian Brock’s Wondrously Wounded: Theology, Disability, and the Body of Christ

Churches in the modern world must increasingly realize that we have to reckon with difficult issues involving mental wellbeing, disability, and related concerns. As a pastor in London, one of the world’s largest urban centers where there were fewer ways even just . . . Continue reading →