Baptists, The Definition Of Reformed, And Identity Politics (Part 1)

It is a widely held belief among a relatively large number of Baptists and not a few Presbyterian and Reformed (P&R) folk that Baptists can be Reformed. Indeed, it is widely held among those in the Baptistic traditions that they (as distinct . . . Continue reading →

Baptists, The Definition Of Reformed, And Identity Politics (Part 2)

In part one, we began a survey of Reformed statements to demonstrate how the Reformed and the Baptists are two different traditions with distinctly separate understandings of redemptive history. Theodore Beza’s personal confession of faith (Confession De Foi Du Chretien, 1559) was . . . Continue reading →

Baptists, The Definition Of Reformed, And Identity Politics (Part 3)

If the objective, historical evidence is as clear as I claim about the historic definition of the word Reformed, why does this debate even exist? Again, the roots of this debate are partly to be found in the way Baptists think of themselves and others, particularly in the USA. Continue reading →