Review: C. S. Lewis’ Till We Have Faces, 1956 (Part 1)

For now we see in a mirror dimly, but then face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I have been fully known. (1 Corinthians 13:12) Overly ambitious, I recently read C. S. Lewis’ Till . . . Continue reading →

Review: C. S. Lewis’ Till We Have Faces, 1956 (Part 3)

In the first two parts of this analysis of C. S. Lewis’ Till We Have Faces, I laid a foundation by providing a brief summary of the original myth of Cupid and Psyche and noted the similarities between this myth and so . . . Continue reading →

Review: C. S. Lewis’ Till We Have Faces, 1956 (Part 4)

This story, much like the story of every man, does not end with Orual’s confrontation with the divine as a judge—reciting her case as a wannabe plaintiff and being given (supposedly) no answer, or worse, divine judgment—as the only possible outcome of her meeting with God. Continue reading →