The Shifting Culture Of Christian Colleges

And what about Christian colleges? They should be in the business of educating evangelical citizens. Unfortunately, most of them have sacrificed civics, humanities, and liberal arts to professional programs, online classes, continuing education, and cash-cow graduate programs. Yes, evangelical Christian colleges still offer liberal arts courses and give lip service to those courses, but the liberal arts, as I have argued before, no longer define the educational culture of these institutions.

John Fea,Evangelical Churches and Christian Colleges in the Age of Trump

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5 comments

  1. The over reliance on online classes and non-rigorous cash cow majors are not just a curse on Christian colleges. I saw that while teaching at state colleges. The description of running colleges like business is both an apt and tragically true description. What is lost in the end is the welfare of the students.

  2. The following has reference more to the title of this thread than to the quotation itself. I believe there is a connection, though.

    Recently, I heard a prominent leader in the PCA say that if the progressives don’t get their way with women’s issues (IMO, their ultimate goal is women RE’s and TE’s), they may leave the PCA. He also said that, as far as he is concerned, the progressives can take Covenant Seminary and Covenant College with them.

    This news story gave me pause and made me reconsider his remarks:

    http://theaquilareport.com/student-athletes-take-a-knee-during-national-anthem/

  3. Curt – I worked on my graduate degree back in the late 80’s in a field that prided itself in the training of telecommunications technology. In fact, the director of this particular department was the chairman of “distance learning.” Nevertheless, when I approached him at one point to request the opportunity to take my graduate classes at a learning center much closer to my home (I had to drive a 100 mile round trip twice a week to attend classes in person), he responded “no, we need students to be here in person so they can rub elbows with other students to enhance the learning process.”

    So, the educational system talks one way out of the right side of its mouth while practicing the other way out of the left side, depending upon which way the favorable winds are blowing. What else is new?

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