Office Hours Episodes One and Two Now Online

OfficeHoursArtworkThe podcast is available via RSS or in iTunes and now the interviews with Bob Godfrey and Julius Kim are godfreyOH on the WSC website.

Here’s the interview with W. Robert Godfrey, president of Westminster Seminary California and Professor of Church History.kimjuliusOH

Here’s the interview with Julius Kim, Associate Professor of Practical Theology and Dean of Students at WSC.

But wait, there’s more! There’s a special edition of Office Hours coming on Tuesday, Sept. 8 (9:00 AM Pacific). The next regularly scheduled episode of Office Hours will be released, Dv, on October 5 (9:00 AM Pacific). Thanks for listening!

If you’re just finding out about Office Hours, you’ll want to hear the preview to find out how to get the most out of the program.

    Post authored by:

  • R. Scott Clark
    Author Image

    R.Scott Clark is the President of the Heidelberg Reformation Association, the author and editor of, and contributor to several books and the author of many articles. He has taught church history and historical theology since 1997 at Westminster Seminary California. He has also taught at Wheaton College, Reformed Theological Seminary, and Concordia University. He has hosted the Heidelblog since 2007.

    More by R. Scott Clark ›

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7 comments

  1. Try refreshing your browser. If needs be, you might have to clear your browser’s cache (in settings).

    Have you tried subscribing to the podcast in iTunes? That’s the best thing to do so you won’t miss any episodes.

    Did you try the links I provided above?

  2. Yes, I subscribed to wscal office hours via RSS. I use Google reader and not a fan of itunes. But I got the audio, thanks.

  3. I just listened to the interview with Dr. Julius Kim and very much enjoyed hearing him speak about his time in Korea and China, and his thoughts about the way believers in both countries need to reorient their theology around the centrality of Christ and the church. This was important to me for several reasons. I taught for the last four years in Tianjin, China at a Christian international school to which many Korean expatriate families living in the city sent their children. Because of this opportunity, I had many good opportunities to observe both the church in China and the type of Christianity that was embraced by Korean believers in our school community as well, and was encouraged by many things that I saw (i.e. how God is working in bringing many to Himself in those countries), but saw a danger in some aspects as well, which Dr. Kim addressed in his interview. I was disappointed several times to see many Chinese and Korean believers in our communities embrace experiential, mystical and, as Dr. Kim perfectly put it, syncretistic explanations of theology, and I agree with Dr. Kim that it has a lot to do with both countries’ centuries-old embracing of Confucian, Daoist and Buddhist ideologies. I think it also might have to do with the way, at least in the case of China that I directly observed, that Westerners are currently doing ministry in Asia, teaching an Emergent-type of message about theology, God and the church. Sin and justification were topics that were not taught enough, while a God who loved everyone the same way and personal transformation through service were more emphasized. I left China with a desire to learn more of Reformed theology myself, encouraged by a colleague who was a Korean-American pastor and graduate of Westminster Theological Seminary of Philadelphia, and to look for ways in the future to get involved in helping the church in China and Korea to reconnect with, or perhaps discover for the first time, a solid theology centered on Christ and the church. I am so glad that there is someone like Dr. Kim teaching at Westminster, writing and training up pastors to do just that, and I look forward to hearing more from him and his efforts to partner with the church in Korea. Thank you for this interview with him that introduced me to his ministry!

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